Self Acceptance Fairy

Sonja Wieck

A Denver area triathlete enjoying every day of swim bike run. Mom to Annie, wife to Troy, and guide to a few brave athletes, I'm always in search of the next adventure.

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5 Responses

  1. Kim says:

    Thank you for such an awesome post. Many lines resonated within me. I know I’m on a path of discovery right now. This was just such a great post and read. Thank you for sharing and writing.

  2. Jane says:

    I consistantly hear about negative and positive thoughts and how for me its totally unhelpful. The fact that we are taught, from birth, that there are happy, sad, negativem positive thoughts is totally unhelpful and that we are just having ‘thoughts’ is so much more helpful. Its our brains way of protecting us and to try and shut out those negative thoughts is 1) impossible (we are ‘thinking’ beings) and 2) unwise as sometimes those negative thoughts are a process we must listen to. I began reading about ACT- acceptance and commitment therapy (a form of mindfullness) which focuses on this exact thing. If you love it as much as me if you read it hopefully it will change your life! :)

  3. Fred Johnson says:

    What an insightful way to look at our lifestyles. Especially when it comes to training and racing, I think the “negative brain” analysis is exactly what keeps people (me) from moving past certain plateaus, like faster run times. It hurts and the negative brain knows it. It begs the question how to convince NB to stand down when its time to run. Great blog. I am enjoying it and sharing it with my daughters. -FJ

  4. Nailed it. It seems, especially for women, negative self talk is one of the last things to go for otherwise enlightened, progress-making individuals.
    Someone once wrote, would you let someone speak to your best friend the way you’re speaking to yourself in your head? I thought that was an excellent way to look at it.

    • Sonja Wieck says:

      It is an insightful way to look at it. Most women are harder on themselves and have higher expectations for themselves than anyone else in their lives. The shame that comes with not being perfect, whatever you define that to be, is real and pervasive amongst women.

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